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indoor plant hazards to your pets!

September 10, 2014

Beware of hazards in your home regarding your pets!

 

 

There are many, including different household cleaners, phenolic compounds (found in disinfectants, wood preservatives), weedkillers, rodent poison, ant bait, slug bait pellets, insecticides (note my previous post about carnivorous plants as the solution) and anti-freeze .

 

But there are safe, environmental friendly, non-poisonous alternatives to most of the above products that you will find in your hardware and grocery stores.

 

What many pet owners don't realize, sometimes until it's too late, that there are a number of plants that are toxic to pets (I'm referring to typical housepets - cats, dogs, hamsters, etc).

Usually cats, for example, sense which plants are poisonous and won't touch them. But to be sure, avoid having in your home plants toxic for your pets. This also means that you should keep these plants in mind when you purchase flower bouquets for your home. Either avoid purchasing bouquets with these particular flowers (tulips, daffodils, for example), or you have to do what I do - have the bouquets in vases up on shelves where you pet can't get to. Especially tricky I know, with cats, but do-able.

 

I used to have lot of plants in my former residence, some that are included in the list below, among them: clivia lily, ficus and hibiscus. My cats never chewed on the clivia plants or ficus. However, one of them took a little bite out of a hibiscus leaf. I didn't realize it until I noticed her in the litter box. Let's just say it wasn't pretty - slimy and greenish. Fortunately I was able to contact our cats' vet, and was informed that the cat probably ingested some of a plant. I checked around the apartment and saw the unmistakable little bite in a hibiscus leaf! I received some instructions that worked almost immediately - boil a little bit of lean ground beef in water, let it cool and put with the cooled off cooking liquid in a bowl for the cat.  This settled her stomach, and she was fine.

 

That solution worked for a particular situation, but always contact your vet immediately if your pet shows signs of poisoning - vomiting, diarrhea, extreme excitement, convulsions.

 

Here is a partial list of potentially poisonous to your pets:

 

Achira

Adam and Eve

African Daisy

African Violet

African Wonder Tree

Algaroba

Alocasia (including Elephant Ears)

Aloe

Alsike Clover

Aluminum Plant

Alumroot

Alyssum

Amaryllis

American Rubberplant

Anthurium

Arrowgrass

Arum Lily

Asian Lily

Asparagus Fern

Autumn Crocus

Avocado

Azalea

Bamboo Palm

Begonia

Bird of Paradise

Bluebottle

Burro's Tail

Buttercup

Calla Lily

California Pitcher Plant

Cape Jasmine

Carnation

Castor Bean

Cattleya Labiata (Orchid)

Ceriman

Chinese Jade

Chocolate Soldier

Christmas Cactus

Christmas Dagger (Fern)

Christmas Orchid

Christmas Rose

Chrysanthemum

Cliff Brake

Clivia Lily

Coffee Tree

Crown-of-Thorns

Cutleaf Philodendron

Cyclamen

Daffodil

Dahlia

Dallas Fern

Day Lilies

Dieffenbachia

Dracaena

Dwarf palms of all kinds

Exotica

Foxglove

Gardenia

Geranium

Gladiola

Gloxenia

Hibiscus

Holly

Hyacinth

Hydrangea

Iris

Ivy

Jade Plant

Japanese Aralia

Jonquil

Laurel

Lily of the Valley

Mexican Breadfruit

Mistletoe

Morning Glory

Mountain Laurel

Narcissus

Peace Lily

Philodendron

Pine Needles

Poinsettia

Rhododendron

Tulip

Venus Fly Trap

Yew

 

 

For more lists of potentially poisonous plants you can check :

 

http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control/toxic-and-non-toxic-plants/a?&

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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